Sunday, August 02, 2009

Governors Island on a Saturday

Generally I am pretty good with electronics. I know how to program the DVR and VCR, I can set the alarm clock, program the GPS and generally care for my computer, modem, virus scan etc. However, I got a new camera and it is just confounding me. My whole life of filme consisted of manual cameras, and I've never had auto-anything on a camera. But with digital it just doesn't work that way. Light meters? Bah!

So yesterday I thought I was getting some great shots at Governor's Island, when in fact it turns out I had, at some point during the day when I thought I was changing the aperture, instead I had accidentally adjusted the light compensation to overexpose everything. When you are out in the bright sun, it is impossible to see on the tiny little screen that things aren't working properly.

In fact I did notice that the camera was telling me about a lot of overexposed skies, but I thought it was because of how bright it was compared to the main subject. I can't tell the difference between normal variations and significant ones. Lesson learned.

What is most screwy about this adjustment is that the camera remembers it forever, even after it is shut off and/or other dials are moved around. Sigh...
















Any suggestions on avoiding such disasters are appreciated.

4 comments:

Melanie said...

Wow-great coverage--wondered what it was like there--looks nice.

Jill said...

The ferry is free and it is a really pleasant way to spend a quiet afternoon with a picnic and a book. They had mini golf, free kayaking, bike rentals, a couple of art installations, a free shuttle that goes around the island, and a free guided tour. It was a very hot day but we managed to find a spot under a tree that was breezy and cool; it was hard to leave.

chris said...

can you shoot in RAW mode on your camera? if so, all of that would have been correctable. requires more post process work, of course...

JP said...

Flickr offers a tool called Picnic that may help you correct some of your over-exposed shots. It took me two years to get a handle on my camera, and I still occasionally end up with inferior pictures.